Young Noah Explains Why He Left Clear Sight

 Atlanta hip-hop artist Young Noah left Flame’s record label, Clear Sight Music, early this year after working with it since October of 2011.

“Clear Sight and Young Noah had a dope experience,” Flame told Wade-O Radio. “I just think the label and Young Noah had different ideas and a different direction in the way that we were going to do things.”

Flame made noise in March with his controversial track “ #1 Spot” in which he voiced his displeasure with the direction of Christian hip-hop artists’ musical content. The St. Louis rapper’s irritation, which stemmed from an alleged watering down of the gospel in the sub-genre, isn’t why Clear Sight and Young Noah broke up.

At the conclusion of Flame’s interview with DJ Wade-O, he mentioned that Young Noah had “some dope ideas” in terms of non-musical ministry. Those dope ideas are what led to the split.

Young Noah is a part of Dirty Work Ministries, an urban outreach organization that he started years ago with fellow hip-hop artist Plain James. On a trip to Trinidad, the rappers met a man who—at the time—owned six acres of land outside of Atlanta and felt called to sponsor their ministry.

The ultimate goal—which will be reached in closer to 25 years than five—is for Dirty Work to use their newfound resources to acquire 100 acres of land [it currently owns 20] to build parks, swimming pools and vocational schools, house the homeless, teach unwed teenage mothers how to take care of their children and more— anything to better the community. Young Noah compared it to a Boys and Girls Club, except they’ll be able to talk about Jesus as much as they want.

“When I brought that whole thing to the label,” Young Noah told Wade-O Radio, “they thought it would conflict with what they were trying to do with Young Noah as an artist. It’s tough when you’re on the road three shows a week. You don’t really have time to do a lot of the stuff you’re passionate about as well as music when you’re on the road that much.”

Clear Sight’s focus is ministry through music, which is why Flame and company were concerned about having a business relationship with an artist whose heart was elsewhere. There weren’t enough hours in the day for them to work together and make up for their varying ministerial priorities.

“Music is the core of who I am, but I know it’s temporary,” he said. “You can’t rap forever.” Young Noah stressed that bitterness hasn’t been left in wake of his departure from Clear Sight. He’s still close to Flame and loved making music with the label, but their callings simply took them down different paths. They knew a split was necessary.

“In my heart, I always questioned, ‘Lord, is this my destiny, to just be doing these concerts?’ asked Young Noah. “It was all for the glory of God. I enjoyed it. A lot of people were blessed. I ministered to hundreds of thousands of people, but I always wondered, is this all you want me to do?” As immense of a platform as Clear Sight is, Young Noah refused to put his off-the-mic pursuits on the back burner.

 

 

 

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